Clinical expertise, advocacy and enhanced autonomy – Acceptability of a pharmacist-facilitated medicines review intervention for community-dwelling Māori older adults

Joanna Hikaka*, Rhys Jones, Carmel Hughes, Hunter Amende, Martin J. Connolly, Nataly Martini

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background:
Pharmacist-facilitated medicines reviews are effective at identifying medicines-related problems and can improve the appropriate use of medicines in older adults. Current services in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) are not developed specifically for Māori (Indigenous people of NZ) and may increase health disparities between Māori and non-Māori. We developed a medicines review intervention for and with Māori older adults, and tested it in a feasibility study.

Objective:
To assess patient acceptability of a pharmacist-facilitated medicines review intervention for Māori older adults.

Methods:
The intervention consisted of a medicines education session (pharmacist and participant) and an optional medicines optimisation session (pharmacist, participant, and prescriber). Participant acceptability was assessed post-intervention using a structured telephone interview developed specifically for this study. Participants responded to statements using a five-point Likert scale (strongly agree-strongly disagree; numerical analysis/reporting) which focused on the topics of power/control, support mechanisms, intervention content and delivery, and perceived usefulness. Open-ended questions relating to the intervention value and suggestions for improvement were analysed using general inductive analysis.

Results:
Seventeen participants took part in the feasibility study from December 2019–March 2020 and all completed the acceptability interview. Participants perceived the intervention content and mode of delivery to be appropriate, and that their power and control over their medicines and health improved and as did their confidence in self-management. Five themes were generated: medicines knowledge from a trusted professional, increased advocacy, ‘by Māori, for Māori’, increased confidence and control, and financial and resource implications.

Conclusion:
A pharmacist-facilitated medicines review intervention for Māori older adults developed by Māori, for Māori, was acceptable to patient participants. Participants valued the clinical expertise and advocacy provided by the pharmacist, and the increase in medicines knowledge, control and autonomy. Participants wanted the service to continue on an ongoing basis.
Original languageEnglish
JournalExploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy
Early online date23 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 23 Apr 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical expertise, advocacy and enhanced autonomy – Acceptability of a pharmacist-facilitated medicines review intervention for community-dwelling Māori older adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this