Cognitive inhibition and interference in dissociative indentity disorder: the effects of anxiety on specific executive functions: The effects of anxiety on specific executive functions

Martin J. Dorahy, Chris G. McCusker, Richard J. Loewenstein, Kimberly Colbert, Ciaran Mulholland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using an experimentally based, computer-presented task, this study assessed cognitive inhibition and interference in individuals from the dissociative identity disorder (DID; n=12), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n=12) and non-clinical (n=12) populations. Participants were assessed in a neutral and emotionally negative (anxiety provoking) context, manipulated by experimental instructions and word stimuli. The DID sample displayed effective cognitive inhibition in the neutral but not the anxious context. The GAD sample displayed the opposite findings. However, the interaction between group and context failed to reach significance. There was no indication of an attentional bias to non-schema specific negative words in any sample. Results are discussed in terms of the potential benefit of weakened cognitive inhibition during anxious arousal in dissociative individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)749-764
Number of pages16
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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