Collaboration, Collaborators, and Conflict: Archaeology and Peacebuilding in Northern Ireland

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Abstract

Collaboration in contemporary archaeological parlance principally refers to active engagement with one or more selected groups of stakeholders and co-producers of knowledge. Yet to be a “collaborator” in conflict settings implies an allegiance, often deceitful, to one cause or another. When embedding archaeology in conflict transformation activities, being seen as a “collaborator”, or partisan, can therefore actively work against the aims of peacebuilding. Drawing upon experience in conflict transformation within post-Troubles Northern Ireland, issues of ethics and positionality are considered, and an alternative terminology for embedding archaeology in peacebuilding activity is posited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)444-465
JournalArchaeologies
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Sep 2019

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