Comparing the relationship between stature and later life health in six low and middle income countries

Mark E. McGovern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)
254 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between stature and later life health in 6 emerging economies, each of which are expected to experience significant increases in the mean age of their populations over the coming decades. Using data from the WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) and pilot data from the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India (LASI), I show that various measures of health are associated with height, a commonly used proxy for childhood environment. In the pooled sample, a 10 cm increase in height is associated with between a 2 and 3 percentage point increase in the probability of being in very good or good self-reported health, a 3 percentage point increase in the probability of reporting no difficulties with activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living, and between a fifth and a quarter of a standard deviation increase in grip strength and lung function. Adopting a methodology previously used in the research on inequality, I also summarise the height-grip strength gradient for each country using the concentration index, and provide a decomposition analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-148
Number of pages21
JournalThe Journal of the Economics of Ageing
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparing the relationship between stature and later life health in six low and middle income countries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this