Confocal infrared imaging with optical coherence tomography provides superior detection of a number of common macular lesions compared to colour fundus photography

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare diagnostic accuracy of confocal infrared reflectance (IR), with and without optical coherence tomography (OCT), to colour fundus photography (CFP) in the Northern Ireland Cohort for the Longitudinal Study of Ageing (NICOLA) Study.

METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study of participants in NICOLA. CFP, IR and IR/OCT of 640 eyes were graded for hard, soft and reticular pseudodrusen; geographic atrophy; choroidal neovascularisation; naevus; epiretinal membrane; and haemorrhages. Test characteristics (sensitivity and specificity) for each imaging modality with respect to each retinal feature were calculated.

RESULTS: With CFP as the reference standard, sensitivity of IR by itself ranged from 75% for RPD to 93.5% for hard drusen and specificity was above 90% for all features except hard drusen (71.7%). For IR combined with OCT, sensitivity ranged from 80% for choroidal neovascularisation to 96.5% for hard drusen. When IR alone was the reference standard, CFP sensitivity was high for naevi (97.5%) but reduced markedly for epiretinal membrane (48.5%). When the combination of IR and OCT was the reference standard, sensitivity for CFP was least for epiretinal membrane (31.5%), low for geographic atrophy and reticular pseudodrusen (77.8% and 76.2% respectively) and high for all other lesion types.

CONCLUSION: Our findings support the use of confocal IR with OCT as a screening tool for a variety of features of macular disease in community optometric practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)574-583
JournalOphthalmic & physiological optics : the journal of the British College of Ophthalmic Opticians (Optometrists)
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Dec 2018

Bibliographical note

© 2018 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2018 The College of Optometrists.

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