Cost-utility analysis of molnupiravir plus usual care versus usual care alone as early treatment for community-based adults with COVID-19 and increased risk of adverse outcomes in the UK PANORAMIC trial

May Ee Png, Victoria Harris, Jenna Grabey, Nigel David Hart, Bhautesh Dinesh Jani, Daniel Butler, Andrew Carson-Stevens, Maria Coates, Lucy Cureton, Melissa Dobson, Jienchi Dorward, Philip Evans, Nick Francis, Oghenekome Abisoye Gbinigie, Gail Hayward, Jane Holmes, Kerenza Hood, Saye Khoo, Haroon Ahmed, Mark LownMicheal Mckenna, Sam Mort, Jonathan Nguyen-Van-Tam, Najib Rahman, Duncan B Richards, Nicholas Thomas, Oliver van Hecke, FD Richard Hobbs, Paul Little, Ly-mee Yu, Christopher C. Butler, Stavros Petrou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The cost-effectiveness of molnupiravir, an oral antiviral for early treatment of SARS-CoV-2, has not been established in vaccinated populations. Aim: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of molnupiravir relative to usual care alone among mainly vaccinated community-based people at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19 over six months. Design and setting: Economic evaluation of the PANORAMIC trial in the UK. Method: A cost-utility analysis that adopted a UK National Health Service and personal social services perspective and a six-month time horizon was performed using PANORAMIC trial data. Cost-effectiveness was expressed in terms of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses assessed the impacts of uncertainty and heterogeneity. Threshold analysis explored the price for molnupiravir consistent with likely reimbursement. Results: In the base case analysis, molnupiravir had higher mean costs of £449 (95% confidence interval [CI] 445 to 453) and higher mean QALYs of 0.0055 (95% CI 0.004 to 0.007) than usual care (mean incremental cost per QALY of £81190). Sensitivity and subgroup analyses showed similar results, except those aged ≥75 years with a 55% probability of being cost-effective at a £30000 per QALY threshold. Molnupiravir would have to be priced around £147 per course to be cost-effective at a £15000 per QALY threshold. Conclusion: Molnupiravir at the current cost of £513 per course is unlikely to be cost-effective relative to usual care over a six-month time horizon among mainly vaccinated COVID-19 patients at increased risk of adverse outcomes, except those aged ≥75 years.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Early online date16 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 16 Jan 2024

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