Dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder: The psychological sequelae of bloody Sunday and the response of state services

P. Hayes, Jim Campbell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective: This article describes the political context of health and social care services in Northern Ireland at a the of intense social conflict. Method: Concepts from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other relevant international psychological literature are then used to study the experience of the Bloody Sunday families, victims of a traumatic event that happened in Derry in January 1972. Results: High levels of psychological morbidity within this population are reported, alongside some evidence that families had not received services that may have helped resolve the trauma. Conclusions: The authors noted that new services planned as a result of the current peace process may offer social workers and other professionals new ways to address the unmet needs of people traumatized by the Troubles.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)705-720
    Number of pages16
    JournalResearch on Social Work Practice
    Volume10
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

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    posttraumatic stress disorder
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
    Psychology
    Northern Ireland
    Social Work
    social conflict
    peace process
    Morbidity
    Delivery of Health Care
    morbidity
    trauma
    social worker
    Wounds and Injuries
    Population
    event
    health
    evidence
    experience
    Conflict (Psychology)
    Social Workers

    Cite this

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    title = "Dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder: The psychological sequelae of bloody Sunday and the response of state services",
    abstract = "Objective: This article describes the political context of health and social care services in Northern Ireland at a the of intense social conflict. Method: Concepts from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other relevant international psychological literature are then used to study the experience of the Bloody Sunday families, victims of a traumatic event that happened in Derry in January 1972. Results: High levels of psychological morbidity within this population are reported, alongside some evidence that families had not received services that may have helped resolve the trauma. Conclusions: The authors noted that new services planned as a result of the current peace process may offer social workers and other professionals new ways to address the unmet needs of people traumatized by the Troubles.",
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    Dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder: The psychological sequelae of bloody Sunday and the response of state services. / Hayes, P.; Campbell, Jim.

    In: Research on Social Work Practice, Vol. 10, 2000, p. 705-720.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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