Dendrochronological evidence for a lower water-table on peatland around 3200-3000 BC from subfossil pine in northern Scotland

A.K. Moir, S.A.G. Leroy, David Brown, P.E.F. Collins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Tree-ring analysis of subfossil Pinus sylvestris L., from nine new peatland sites located beyond the species’ current northern limit in Scotland, established a regional chronology called WRATH-9. The chronology has been provisionally dated against Irish pine chronologies and provides the first annual resolution picture of Scots pine expansion from c. 3200 bc and subsequent demise from c. 3000 bc. Pine germination and growth is suggested to be associated with a widespread fall in bog water-tables that indicates a regional climatic control. Bog pines progressively declined in number, rather than died out in a single event, reflecting their growth in a marginal habitat, close to a critical ecological threshold. The use of tree-ring sequences from in situ bog pine macrofossils provides a higher resolution insight into past conditions than possible with existing radiocarbon and pollen-based chronologies.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)931-942
    Number of pages12
    JournalThe Holocene
    Volume20 (6)
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Earth-Surface Processes
    • Global and Planetary Change
    • Ecology
    • Palaeontology

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