Denial, Silence and the Politics of the Past: Unpicking the Opposition to Truth Recovery in Northern Ireland

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    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There has been considerable and protracted debate on whether a formal truth recovery process should be established in Northern Ireland. Some of the strongest opposition to the creation of such a body has been from unionist political elites and the security forces. Based on qualitative fieldwork, this article argues that the dynamics of denial and silence have been instrumental in shaping their concerns. It explores how questions of memory, identity and denial have created a ‘myth of blamelessness’ in unionist discourse that is at odds with the reasons for a truth process being established. It also examines how three interlocking manifestations of silence – ‘silence as passivity,’ ‘silence as loyalty’ and ‘silence as pragmatism’ – have furthered unionists’ opposition to dealing with the past. This article argues that making peace with the past requires an active deconstruction of these practices.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberijs029
    Pages (from-to)157-177
    Number of pages21
    JournalInternational Journal of Transitional Justice
    Volume7
    Issue number1
    Early online date21 Nov 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Law

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