Dental palaeopathological analysis of the eneolithic-early Iron Age populations from the Minusinsk Basin, Southern Siberia: Palaeodietary Implications

S. V. Svyatko*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here we present the attempt to reconstruct the dietary habits of the five major cultural horizons in Southern Siberia (Afanasyevo, Okunev, Andronovo, Karasuk and Tagar cultures, Nind = 214) over a time period spanning three millennia (25th-1st centuries BC) through the assessment of the dental palaeopathology of the people. The data has been compared with the results of earlier stable isotope analysis. The results indicate that (a) the major shifts happened in the dental condition of the Karasuk and Tagar populations, and these only partly correspond with the isotopic data; (b) the inverse relation between frequency of calculus and caries through the populations is possibly related to the consumption of less animal protein and the greater reliance on cereals by the Tagar and Karasuk people; (c) the frequency of metabolic stress, associated with dental enamel hypoplasia, gradually deteriorated from the Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age, which is possibly related to millet adoption in the Minusinsk Basin in the 14th century BC; (d) in all cases, the oral health of individuals deteriorated with age; and (e) in most cases males had higher percentages of various diseases, which does not correlate with the associated isotopic data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-156
JournalArchaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bronze Age
  • Dental palaepathology analysis
  • diet
  • Early Iron Age
  • Minusinsk Basin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Cultural Studies

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