Detection and characterization of a chicken astrovirus associated with hatchery disease in commercial day-old turkeys in southwestern Nigeria

Adebowale I. Adebiyi*, Kerry McIlwaine, Daniel O. Oluwayelu, Victoria J. Smyth

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Infectious diseases are a major obstacle to profitable poultry production in Nigeria due to the mortality and severe economic losses they cause. In particular, they are a potent threat to attainment of the food security goals of government and national self-sufficiency in food production. Thus, there is a need for continuous monitoring of the nation’s poultry population for these diseases. As part of an ongoing investigation of enteric viruses associated with poor performance or hatchery diseases in commercial poultry in southwestern Nigeria, intestinal contents from 97 condemned or runted day-old commercial turkey poults were examined for turkey astroviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, chicken astrovirus (CAstV), avian nephritis virus, avian rotavirus, avian reovirus, fowl adenovirus, and chicken parvovirus by virus isolation, electron microscopy (EM), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and reverse transcription PCR. The samples were collected from five commercial hatcheries and five farms located in southwestern Nigeria. While all samples tested negative for other viruses, CAstV was detected in the majority (83.5%) of the birds, although some pleomorphic virus-like particles with surface projections that appeared fringed or fimbriated were observed in five of the cell culture samples by EM. Phylogenetic analysis revealed these CAstV strains belonged to the Bi clade. These findings not only implicate CAstV as the major cause of hatchery condemnations in commercial turkeys in southwestern Nigeria but also highlight the need for experimental studies to further establish its role in this disease condition
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationArchives of Virology
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 23 Mar 2021

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