Detection and partial characterization of human B cell colony stimulating activity in synovial fluids of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

A C Fay, A Trudgett, J D McCrea, F Kirk, Jonathan Thompson, E S Mitchell, M J Boyd, S D Roberts, T A McNeill

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The joint fluids of 37 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, eight patients with traumatic injuries to their joints, two patients with Reiter's syndrome and three patients with psoriatic arthritis were tested for the presence of B cell colony stimulating activity (B cell CSA). B cell CSA was found in all of the joint fluids from the patients with rheumatoid arthritis but in none of the joint fluids from patients with traumatic injuries to their joints or in the joint fluids from the patients with Reiter's syndrome. A trace of B cell CSA was found in the joint fluid of one of the three patients with psoriatic arthritis. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.796) between the amount of rheumatoid factor present in the joint fluids and the titre of B cell CSA. This correlation was highly significant (P less than 0.001). The B cell CSA was localized to component(s) with molecular weight ranges 115-129 kD and 64-72 kD and an isoelectric point of 6.8. Its activity was sensitive to reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol and to the oxidising action of potassium periodate.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-22
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and experimental immunology
Volume60
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - May 1985

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Arthritis
  • Arthritis, Reactive
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • B-Lymphocytes
  • Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
  • Female
  • Growth Substances
  • Humans
  • Interleukin-4
  • Isoelectric Point
  • Joints
  • Lymphokines
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Molecular Weight
  • Psoriasis
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • Synovial Fluid

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