Detection of Staphylococcus aureus by 16S rRNA directed in situ hybridisation in a patient with a brain abscess caused by small colony variants.

Wilma Ziebuhr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kipp F, Ziebuhr W, Becker K, Krimmer V, Höbeta N, Peters G, Von Eiff C. Institute of Medical Microbiology, Hospital and Clinics, University of Münster, Germany. A 45 year old man was admitted to hospital with a right sided facial paralysis and three month history of seizures. Computed tomography showed a left temporal mass including both intracerebral and extracerebral structures. Ten years earlier the patient had undergone a neurosurgical intervention in the same anatomical region to treat a subarachnoid haemorrhage. In tissue samples and pus obtained during neurosurgery, Staphylococcus aureus was detected by a 16S rRNA-directed in situ hybridisation technique. Following long term cultivation, small colony variants (SCV) of methicillin resistant S aureus were identified. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of vancomycin and rifampin followed by prolonged treatment with teicoplanin, with no sign of infection on follow up nine months after discharge. This is the first report in which S aureus SCV have been identified as causative organisms in a patient with brain abscess and in which in situ hybridisation has been used to detect S aureus in a clinical specimen containing SCV. Antimicrobial agents such as rifampin which have intracellular activity should be included in treatment of infections caused by S aureus SCV.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1000-1002
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
Volume74(7)
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jul 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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