Determining the Sun's influence on Lateglacial and Holocene climates: a focus on climate response to centennial-scale solar forcing at 2800 cal. BP

Gill Plunkett, G.T. Swindles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of solar variability on the climate of the Lateglacial and Holocene periods has been the subject of increasing discussion during the last decade. In the Mid-Holocene, several studies have identified cold/wet events that occur at ca 2800 cal. BP and a link with a reduction in solar activity, inferred from the C-14 record, has been postulated. We present results from a multi-proxy study of peat humification, plant macrofossils and testate amoebae from a raised bog at Glen West, northwest Ireland, that indicate that dry bog surface conditions were experienced in the north of Ireland at the time of the solar anomaly starting at 2800 cal. BP. With the aid of C-14 wiggle-matching and tephrochronology, an abrupt shift to wetter conditions is dated to ca 2700 cal. BP, coinciding with a C-14 maximum but clearly post-dating the 2800 cal. BP event identified elsewhere in Europe. We explore the significance of this apparent lag in the Irish record, considering the possible role of the ocean in generating spatial and temporal complexities in the climate patterns of the North Atlantic region. We conclude that these complexities are likely to give rise to time-transgressive climate responses around the North Atlantic that will only be recognised by more critical chronological approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-184
Number of pages10
JournalQuaternary Science Reviews
Volume27
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth-Surface Processes

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