Developing a series of inhaled reversible peptide inhibitors against Cathepsin S

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting over 100,000 patients globally. Caused by a large number of mutations affecting the CFTR gene (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator).
This defect leads to abnormal ion transport across lung cells surface, decreased water level resulting in mucus obstruction, inflammation, and bacterial infection. Figure(1).
Several studies have shown that Cathepsin S (CatS) a cysteine protease found mainly in antigen - presenting cells, to be involved in CF. A study at Queen’s University Belfast, showed it to be elevated in 100% of CF patients. Furthermore, studies using CatS knockout showed improved bacterial clearance and reduced inflammation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWinter School (Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences) Meeting 2021: Proteinases and their Inhibitors
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2021

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