Development of a vehicle model architecture to improve modeling flexibility

G. Stevens, M. Murtagh, R. Kee, J. Early, R. Best

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
322 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this paper a dynamic, modular, 1-D vehicle model architecture is presented that seeks to improve modelling flexibility and can be rapidly adapted to new vehicle concepts, including hybrid vehicles. Interdependencies between model sub-systems are minimized to improve model flexibility. Each subsystem of the vehicle model follows a standardized signal architecture allowing subsystems to be developed, tested and validated separately from the main model and easily re-integrated. Standard dynamic equations are used to calculate the rotational speed of the desired driveline component within each subsystem i.e. dynamic calculations are carried out with respect to the component of interest. Sample simulations are presented for isolated and integrated components to demonstrate flexibility. Two vehicle test cases are presented. The application to a conventional heavy-duty vehicle demonstrates the operational capabilities of the modelling methodology, while the inclusion of electrical components to form a mild-hybrid heavy-duty vehicle shows the model’s potential for predicting improvements in fuel economy and performance over a specified drive cycle. Qualitative validation of the approach is presented, highlighting the ability of the model to accurately capture dynamic events and fuel consumption profiles.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2017-01-1138
Number of pages9
JournalSAE International Journal of Engines
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Mar 2017
EventSAE World Congress and Exhibition - Cobo Centre, Detroit, United States
Duration: 04 Apr 201707 Apr 2017

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Hybrid vehicles
Fuel economy
Fuel consumption

Keywords

  • Simulation
  • Powertrains
  • Transmissions
  • Modelling

Cite this

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Development of a vehicle model architecture to improve modeling flexibility. / Stevens, G.; Murtagh, M.; Kee, R.; Early, J.; Best, R.

In: SAE International Journal of Engines, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2017-01-1138, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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