Development of composite tissue scaffolds containing naturally sourced mircoporous hydroxyapatite

F. Kusmanto, Gavin Walker, Quan Gan, Pamela Walsh, Fraser Buchanan, Glenn Dickson, Mervyn McCaigue, Christine Maggs, Matthew Dring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of this work were to investigate the conversion of a marine alga into hydroxyapatite (HA), and furthermore to design a composite bone tissue engineering scaffold comprising the synthesised HA within a porous bioresorbable polymer. The marine alga Phymatolithon calcareum, which exhibits a calcium carbonate honeycomb structure, with a natural architecture of interconnecting permeable pores (microporosity 4-11 mu m), provided the initial raw material for this study. The objective was to convert the alga into hydroxyapatite while maintaining its porous morphology using a sequential pyrolysis and chemical synthesis processes. Semi-quantitative XRD analysis of the post-hydrothermal material (pyrolised at 700-750 degrees C), indicated that the calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic most likely consisted of a calcium carbonate macroporous lattice, with hydroxyapatite crystals on the surface of the macropores. Cell visibility (cytotoxicity) investigations of osteogenic cells were conducted on the CaP ceramic (i.e., the material post-hydrothermal analysis) which was found to be non-cytotoxic and displayed good biocompatibility when seeded with MG63 cells. Furthermore, a hot press scaffold fabrication technique was developed to produce a composite scaffold of CaP (derived from the marine alga) in a polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix. A salt leaching technique was further explored to introduce macroporosity to the structure (50-200 mu m). Analysis indicated that the scaffold contained both micro/macroporosity and mechanical strength, considered necessary for bone tissue engineering applications. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier B.V.
LanguageEnglish
Pages398-407
Number of pages10
JournalChemical Engineering Journal
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2008

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Tissue Scaffolds
Durapatite
Algae
Hydroxyapatite
Calcium phosphate
alga
Calcium Carbonate
calcium
Composite materials
phosphate
Calcium carbonate
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering
calcium carbonate
Scaffolds
ceramics
bone
Bone
Honeycomb structures
engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "The aims of this work were to investigate the conversion of a marine alga into hydroxyapatite (HA), and furthermore to design a composite bone tissue engineering scaffold comprising the synthesised HA within a porous bioresorbable polymer. The marine alga Phymatolithon calcareum, which exhibits a calcium carbonate honeycomb structure, with a natural architecture of interconnecting permeable pores (microporosity 4-11 mu m), provided the initial raw material for this study. The objective was to convert the alga into hydroxyapatite while maintaining its porous morphology using a sequential pyrolysis and chemical synthesis processes. Semi-quantitative XRD analysis of the post-hydrothermal material (pyrolised at 700-750 degrees C), indicated that the calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic most likely consisted of a calcium carbonate macroporous lattice, with hydroxyapatite crystals on the surface of the macropores. Cell visibility (cytotoxicity) investigations of osteogenic cells were conducted on the CaP ceramic (i.e., the material post-hydrothermal analysis) which was found to be non-cytotoxic and displayed good biocompatibility when seeded with MG63 cells. Furthermore, a hot press scaffold fabrication technique was developed to produce a composite scaffold of CaP (derived from the marine alga) in a polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix. A salt leaching technique was further explored to introduce macroporosity to the structure (50-200 mu m). Analysis indicated that the scaffold contained both micro/macroporosity and mechanical strength, considered necessary for bone tissue engineering applications. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier B.V.",
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Development of composite tissue scaffolds containing naturally sourced mircoporous hydroxyapatite. / Kusmanto, F.; Walker, Gavin; Gan, Quan; Walsh, Pamela; Buchanan, Fraser; Dickson, Glenn; McCaigue, Mervyn; Maggs, Christine; Dring, Matthew.

In: Chemical Engineering Journal, Vol. 139, No. 2, 01.06.2008, p. 398-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kusmanto, F.

AU - Walker, Gavin

AU - Gan, Quan

AU - Walsh, Pamela

AU - Buchanan, Fraser

AU - Dickson, Glenn

AU - McCaigue, Mervyn

AU - Maggs, Christine

AU - Dring, Matthew

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