Did children’s perceptions of an after-school social learning program predict change in their behavior?

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Abstract

This research explored the influence of children’s perceptions of a pro-social behavior after-school program on actual change in the children’s behavioral outcomes over the program’s duration. Children’s perceptions of three program processes were collected as well as self-reported pro-social and anti-social behavior before and after the program. Statistical models showed that: Positive perceptions of the program facilitators’ dispositions significantly predicted reductions in anti-social behavior; and positive perceptions with the program activities significantly predicted gains in pro-social behavior. The children’s perceptions of their peers’ behavior in the sessions were not found to a significant predictor of behavioral change. The two significant perceptual indicators predicted a small percentage of the change in the behavioral outcomes. However, as after-school social learning programs have a research history of problematic implementation children’s perceptions should be considered in future program design, evaluation and monitoring.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3786-3792
Number of pages7
JournalProcedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
Volume116
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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