Do illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation and quality of life following myocardial infarction?

David P. French*, Robert J P Lewin, Nina Watson, David, R. Thompson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation and quality of life following myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: The illness perceptions of 194 MI patients were assessed whilst the patients were still in hospital following an MI. The mean age was 63.3 years (S.D.=10.6), and 142 of the patients were men. Cardiac rehabilitation attendance and quality of life were assessed via a postal questionnaire 6 months later. Results: In contrast to previous work reported in this area, illness perceptions were not significantly associated with attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. Illness perceptions measured within 24 h of an acute MI were predictive of quality of life 6 months later. Conclusion: Previous reports may have overestimated the extent to which illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The relationship between illness perceptions and quality of life at 6 months suggests that interventions to alter illness perceptions, especially perceptions of consequences, may be useful in improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following an MI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-322
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Nov 2005

Keywords

  • Cardiac rehabilitation
  • Illness perception
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

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