Does antenatal education prepare fathers for their role as birth partners and for parenthood?

Suzie Smyth, Dale Spence, Karen Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to explore fathers' opinions and views on antenatal education and its effectiveness in preparing them for their role as birth partners and for parenthood. The findings are categorised under four key themes: outnumbered, excluded, anxious and uncertain, and preparedness. While research suggests that most fathers want to support their partners and be involved in the pregnancy, labour and birth of their baby, they are less likely to attend antenatal classes than women. While fathers who attend antenatal education classes value them, their experiences are not always as positive or helpful in preparing them for their role as birth partners or in parenthood. It was highlighted that men are more likely to feel unprepared when complications at birth arise. A common finding was that men would welcome the opportunity to focus on their individual needs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-342
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07 May 2015

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