Does listening to music support coping with induced stress? Comparing self-chosen and researcher-chosen music.

AnnMarie Groarke, Jenny Groarke, Michael Hogan, Laura Costello, Danielle Lynch

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background: This paper describes two studies that examine the affect regulating effects of music, aiming to extend the scope of previous research using researcher-chosen music and silent control conditions.
Method: In Study 1, 70 students (18–27 years, M = 20.50, SD = 4.95) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: researcher-chosen music, self-chosen music or silent control condition. In Study 2, 75 students (17-34 years, M = 20.23, SD = 3.15) were randomly assigned to researcher-chosen music, self-chosen music, or an active control (listening to a radio show).
Negative affect (NA) was induced using the Trier Social Stress Test, followed by 10 minutes of music listening (self-chosen versus researcher-chosen) or control (silent or active). Self reported anxiety, Heart Rate (HR) and Blood Pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, post-induction, and post-intervention.
Findings: A 3 x 3 Mixed ANOVA found those who listened to music (self and researcherchosen) reported significantly greater anxiety reduction than participants in a silent control. Results also indicated that self-reported anxiety reduction was greatest in the self-selected music condition, but researcher-chosen music was found to be more effective at reducing physiological arousal (i.e., HR) than silence. Results were not replicated in Study 2 when music was compared against an active control condition.
Discussion: These findings suggest that music may provide a cost-effective and easily applied means of emotion regulation in preparing for stressful events, such as awaiting medical procedures. Yet, the results of Study 2 indicate other activities that provide distraction may have similar benefits.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018
Event32nd Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society : Health Psychology Across The Lifespan: Uniting Research, Practice & Policy - Galway, Ireland
Duration: 21 Aug 201825 Aug 2018
http://www.ehps2018.net/

Conference

Conference32nd Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society
CountryIreland
CityGalway
Period21/08/201825/08/2018
Internet address

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    Groarke, A., Groarke, J., Hogan, M., Costello, L., & Lynch, D. (2018). Does listening to music support coping with induced stress? Comparing self-chosen and researcher-chosen music.. Paper presented at 32nd Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society , Galway, Ireland.