Does the precision oncology medicine development pathway deliver value for health systems?

Raymond Henderson, Declan French, Elaine Stewart, Dave Smart, Adam Idica, Jordan Clark, Markus Eckstein, Mark Lawler

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Abstract

e18818 Background: While there is increasing evidence that precision cancer medicines (PCMs) can be more effective than “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) oncology medicines, questions persist as to their cost, availability, and overall patient benefit. We determined whether using a PCM approach to medicines discovery/development delivers medicines within cost constraints of health systems. R&D costs of developing a medicine are a subject of debate, with average estimates ranging from $314 million (M) - $2.8 billion (B). Methods: Data on oncology medicines approved (2011-2020) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were analyzed, employing two approaches to estimate R&D costs to bring the medicine to market: (i) Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) data were compiled from 10-K and 10-Q financial performance filings on the medicine’s development cost through its R&D lifetime. (ii) Employing a base figure of $100,271 (the estimated cost per patient in a phase III clinical trial), costs were calculated, based on data from clinicaltrials.gov. Trial data were split into clinical trial phases and probability of trial success calculated, along with preclinical costs. Cost-of-capital (CoC) approach was applied and if appropriate an orphan drug tax credit (ODTC) was subtracted from the total. Results: 19 PCMs and 11 OSFA oncology drugs listed by the National Cancer Institute which had complete data were analyzed from 22 companies (Table). Initial costs from SEC data suggest a 50% reduced development spend for PCM, ($605M; range = $181M-$1.1B) (Clinical Trial Modelling Analysis: $604M ($63M-$2.29B)), compared to an OSFA oncology drug development spend ($877M; $333M-$3.34B) (Modelling Analysis: $597M ($41M-$1.64B)). Once preclinical costs were added total R&D costs capitalized and ODTC subtracted, there was an 83% increase in costs, from $2.44B ($614M-$5.23B) (Modelling Analysis: $3.1B ($209M-$11.52 B)) for PCMs to $4.46B ($1.59-$14.9B) (Modelling Analysis: $3.92B ($282-$12.74B) for OSFA oncology drugs. SEC data are more accurate, as they capture real data, rather than modelling assumptions. Conclusions: Our results provide an estimate of the R&D spend required to bring an oncology medicine to market. R&D cost of a PCM is below the top range of prior estimates published, while R&D cost of an OSFA oncology medicine is almost twice the cost of a PCM, emphasizing the potential for PCM treatments to deliver care at greater value to patients and health systems.[Table: see text]
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere18818
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume39
Issue number15 supplement
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 May 2021

Keywords

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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