Donor type microchimerism is an infrequent event following liver transplantation and is not associated with graft acceptance

S Norris, M Lawler, S McCann, J Hegarty, C O'Farrelly, Mark Lawler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Donor-type microchimerism, the presence of a minority population of donor-derived haematopoietic cells following solid organ transplantation, has been postulated as a mechanism for induction of donor-specific graft tolerance. The stability, frequency, and relevance of microchimerism with respect to long-term outcome, however, remains uncertain. Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method of microsatellite analysis of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat sequences (STRs) to detect donor-type cells, DNA from 11 patients was analyzed prospectively at specific time points for 12 months following liver transplantation, and from a further six patients retrospectively 2 years after liver transplantation. Using a panel of STRs, transient peripheral blood donor microchimerism was detected in 2 of 11 patients at a single time-point following transplantation, but persistent evidence of donor-derived cells was not observed during the study period. Analysis of DNA extracted from skin and duodenum in two patients likewise failed to show donor-type cells at these sites. None of the six patients in the retrospective arm showed donor microchimerism, resulting in an overall detection rate of 1.58%. These results suggest that donor microchimerism following liver transplantation is an infrequent event, and that the generation of graft tolerance is independent of microchimerism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)848-52
Number of pages5
JournalHepatology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

Keywords

  • Chimera
  • Graft Rejection
  • Humans
  • Liver Transplantation

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