Dwight L. Moody in Ulster: evangelical unity, denominational identity, and the fundamentalist impulse

Andrew Holmes, Stuart Mathieson

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Abstract

The American evangelist Dwight L. Moody visited Ulster on three occasions – 1874, 1883, and 1892 – and his modern, respectable version of revivalism offered a welcome alternative to the ambiguous legacy of the 1859 Ulster revival. Moody stimulated an outpouring of interdenominational activism and may have contributed to a fundamentalist impulse amongst evangelicals. His legacy in Ulster, as elsewhere, was to energise evangelicals but at the expense of weakening the ability, perhaps even the desire, of church members to adhere to denominational principles. In that sense, both so-called ‘fundamentalists’ and ‘modernists’ in Northern Ireland in the 1920s were Moody’s heirs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ecclesiastical History
Early online date11 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 11 Feb 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Religious studies

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