Ecophysiology and ecological limits of symbiotrophic vesicomyid bivalves (Pliocardiinae) in the Southern Ocean

Katrin Linse, Julia D. Sigwart*, Chong Chen, Elena M. Krylova

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Geothermal energy provides an important resource in Antarctic marine ecosystems, exemplified by the recent discovery of large-sized chemosymbiotic vesicomyid bivalves (subfamily Pliocardiinae) in the Southern Ocean. These clams, which we identified as Archivesica s.l. puertodeseadoi, have been reported as dead shells in areas previously covered by Larsen A and B ice shelves (eastern Antarctic Peninsula) and as live animals from active hydrothermal sites in the Kemp Caldera (South Sandwich Arc) at depths of 852–1487 m. Before, A. puertodeseadoi was known only from its type locality in the Argentine Sea, so we considerably extend the range of the species. Observations taken by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) footage show that the clams can live buried in sediment, or epilithically on the surface of rocks in diffuse geothermal flow. Experimental respirometry was conducted at surface pressure on individual bivalves acclimated to either their habitat temperature (4 °C) or elevated temperature (10 °C). The range of standard metabolic rates, from 3.13 to 6.59 (MO2, μmol O2 h−1 g−1 dry tissue mass), is similar to rates measured ex situ for other species in this clade, and rates did not differ significantly between temperature groups. Taken together, these data indicate a range of ecophysiological flexibility for A. puertodeseadoi. Although adapted to a specialist mode of life, this bivalve exploits a relatively broad range of habitats in the Southern Ocean: within sulphidic sediments, epilithically in the presence of diffuse sulphidic flow, or in deep methane-enriched seawater trapped under ice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1423-1437
Number of pages15
JournalPolar Biology
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the scientific cruise leaders Prof Alex Rogers and Prof Gerhard Bohrmann, the masters and crews of RRS James Clark Ross, RRS James Cook and RV Polarstern, and science teams onboard for logistic, technical and shipboard support during JC42. We especially acknowledge the ROV teams from NMF and MARUM for their dedication to collect our samples with ROVs Isis and MARUM QUEST. We are grateful to NERC for funding the ChEsSo Consortium Grant (NE/DO1249X/1) under the lead of Prof Paul Tyler, and to BMBF and MARUM for funding PS119 and MARUM QUEST via grants to Prof Gerhard Bohrmann. We thank Robert S. Carney, Eric E. Cordes, Virginie Héros and Rudo von Cosel (MNHN), Tina Molodtsova (IORAN) for providing specimens of L. myriamae and A. s.l. chuni for this study. We thank Bruce Marshall, James McClintock, and one other anonymous reviewer for comments that improved an earlier version of this paper.

Funding Information:
We thank the scientific cruise leaders Prof Alex Rogers and Prof Gerhard Bohrmann, the masters and crews of RRS James Clark Ross , RRS James Cook and RV Polarstern , and science teams onboard for logistic, technical and shipboard support during JC42. We especially acknowledge the ROV teams from NMF and MARUM for their dedication to collect our samples with ROVs Isis and MARUM QUEST. We are grateful to NERC for funding the ChEsSo Consortium Grant (NE/DO1249X/1) under the lead of Prof Paul Tyler, and to BMBF and MARUM for funding PS119 and MARUM QUEST via grants to Prof Gerhard Bohrmann. We thank Robert S. Carney, Eric E. Cordes, Virginie H?ros and Rudo von Cosel (MNHN), Tina Molodtsova (IORAN) for providing specimens of L. myriamae and A. s.l. chuni for this study. We thank Bruce Marshall, James McClintock, and one other anonymous reviewer for comments that improved an earlier version of this paper.

Funding Information:
The ChEsSo research programme was funded by a NERC Consortium Grant (NE/DO1249X/1) and supported by the Census of Marine Life and the Sloan Foundation all of which are gratefully acknowledged. PS119 was funded by BMBF and MARUM. The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. E. Krylova was supported by State assignment of Minobrnauki, Russia, Theme No. 0149–2019-0009. Acknowledgements

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, The Author(s).

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Caldera
  • Calyptogena
  • Deep sea
  • Hydrothermal vent
  • Oxygen metabolism
  • Vesicomyidae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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