Effects of the amphibian skin-derived bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist peptide, kinestatin, on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines

R. Wang, Mei Zhou, Lei Wang, Tianbao Chen, Christopher Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bradykinin and related peptides are found in the defensive skin secretions of many frogs and toads. While the physiological roles of bradykinin-related peptides in sub-mammalian vertebrates remains obscure, in mammals, including humans, canonical bradykinin mediates a multitude of biological effects including the proliferation of many types of cancer cell. Here we have examined the effect of the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist peptide, kinestatin, originally isolated by our group from the skin secretion of the giant fire-bellied toad, Bombina maxima, on the proliferation of the human prostate cancer cell lines, PC3, DU175 and LnCAP. The bradykinin receptor status of all cell lines investigated was established through PCR amplification of transcripts encoding both B1 and B2 receptor subtypes. Following this demonstration, all cell lines were grown in the presence or absence of kinestatin and several additional bradykinin receptor antagonists of amphibian skin origin and the effects on proliferation of the cell lines was investigated using the MTT assay and by counting of the cells in individual wells of 96-well plates. All of the amphibian skin secretion-derived bradykinin receptor antagonists inhibited proliferation of all of the prostate cancer lines investigated in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, following incubation of peptides with each cell line and analysis of catabolites by mass spectrometry, it was found that bradykinin was highly labile and each antagonist was highly stable under the conditions employed. Bradykinin signalling pathways are thus worthy of further investigation in human prostate cancer cell lines and the evidence presented here would suggest the testing of efficacy in animal models of prostate cancer as a positive outcome could lead to a drug development programme for the treatment of this disease.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-48
Number of pages2
JournalRegulatory Peptides
Volume164
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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