Efficacy and mechanism of hypoxic postconditioning in salvage of ex vivo human rectus abdominis muscle from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury

Andreas Naparus, Homa Ashrafpour, Stefan O P Hofer, Toni Zhong, Ning Huang, Neil J Cahoon, Sandra E McAllister, Peter C Neligan, Trisha Roy, Joan E Lipa, Cho Y Pang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In reconstructive surgery, skeletal muscle may endure protracted ischemia before reperfusion, which can lead to significant ischemia/reperfusion injury. Ischemic postconditioning induced by brief cycles of reperfusion/reocclusion at the end of ischemia has been shown to salvage skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury in several animal models. However, ischemic postconditioning has not been confirmed in human skeletal muscle. Using an established in vitro human skeletal muscle hypoxic conditioning model, we tested our hypothesis that hypoxic postconditioning salvages ex vivo human skeletal muscle from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury and the mechanism involves inhibition of opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and preservation of ATP synthesis. Muscle strips (~0.5×0.5×15mm) from human rectus abdominis muscle biopsies were cultured in Krebs-Henseleit-HEPES buffer, bubbled with 95%N(2)/5%CO(2) (hypoxia) or 95%O(2)/5%CO(2) (reoxygenation). Samples were subjected to 3h hypoxia/2h reoxygenation. Hypoxic postconditioning was induced by one or two cycles of 5min reoxygenation/5min hypoxia after 3h hypoxia. Muscle injury, viability and ATP synthesis after 2h of reoxygenation were assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and ATP content, respectively. Hypoxic postconditioning or treatment with the mPTP-opening inhibitors Cyclosporine A (CsA, 5×10(-6)M) or N-Methyl-4-isoleucine Cyclosporine (NIM811, 5×10(-6)M) 10min before reoxygenation decreased LDH release, increased MTT reduction and increased muscle ATP content (n=7 patients; P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-6
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume686
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05 Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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