Efficacy is Not Everything: Eliciting Women’s Preferences for a Vaginal HIV Prevention Product Using a Discrete-Choice Experiment

Erica N. Browne*, Elizabeth T. Montgomery, Carol Mansfield, Marco Boeri, Brennan Mange, Mags Beksinska, Jill L. Schwartz, Meredith R. Clark, Gustavo F. Doncel, Jenni Smit, Zvavahera M. Chirenje, Ariane van der Straten

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    As new female-initiated HIV prevention products enter development, it is crucial to incorporate women’s preferences to ensure products will be desired, accepted, and used. A discrete-choice experiment was designed to assess the relative importance of six attributes to stated choice of a vaginally delivered HIV prevention product. Sexually active women in South Africa and Zimbabwe aged 18–30 were recruited from two samples: product-experienced women from a randomized trial of four vaginal placebo forms and product-naïve community members. In a tablet-administered survey, 395 women chose between two hypothetical products over eight choice sets. Efficacy was the most important, but there were identifiable preferences among other attributes. Women preferred a product that also prevented pregnancy and caused some wetness (p < 0.001). They disliked a daily-use product (p = 0.002) and insertion by finger (p = 0.002). Although efficacy drove preference, wetness, pregnancy prevention, and dosing regimen were influential to stated choice of a product, and women were willing to trade some level of efficacy to have other more desired attributes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1443-1451
    Number of pages9
    JournalAIDS and Behavior
    Volume24
    Issue number5
    Early online date06 Nov 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 01 May 2020

    Keywords

    • Discrete-choice experiment
    • HIV prevention
    • South Africa
    • Women
    • Zimbabwe

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Psychology
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Infectious Diseases

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