Electric vehicles and opportunities to displace tailgate emissions using Smart Charging controls

Aoife Foley, Brian O Gallachoir

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Under the European Union Renewable Energy Directive each Member State is mandated to ensure that 10% of transport energy (excluding aviation and marine transport) comes from renewable sources by 2020. The Irish Government intends to achieve this target with a number of policies including ensuring that 10% of all vehicles in the transport fleet are powered by electricity by 2020. This paper investigates the impact of the 10% electric vehicle target in Ireland in 2020 using a dynamic programming based long term generation expansion planning model. The model developed optimizes power dispatch using hourly electricity demand curves up to 2020, while incorporating generator characteristics and certain operational requirements such as energy not served and loss of load probability while satisfying constraints on environmental emissions, fuel availability and generator operational and maintenance costs. Two distinct scenarios are analysed based on a peak and off-peak charging regimes in order to simulate the effects of the electric vehicles charging in 2020. The importance and influence of the charging regimes on the amount of energy used and tailgate emissions displaced is then determined.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013
Event8th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environmental Systems (SDEWES2013) - Dubrovnik, Croatia
Duration: 22 Sep 201327 Sep 2013

Conference

Conference8th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environmental Systems (SDEWES2013)
CountryCroatia
CityDubrovnik
Period22/09/201327/09/2013

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