Elevated serum phosphate predicts mortality in renal transplant recipients

G.M. Connolly, R. Cunningham, P.T. McNamee, Ian Young, Alexander Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND.: High serum phosphate has been identified as an important contributor to the vascular calcification seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (Block et al., Am J Kidney Dis 1998; 31: 607). In patients on hemodialysis, elevated serum phosphate levels are an independent predictor of mortality (Block et al., Am J Kidney Dis 1998; 31: 607; Block, Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 2001; 10: 741). The aim of this study was to investigate whether an elevated serum phosphate level was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with a renal transplant.
METHODS.: Three hundred seventy-nine asymptomatic renal transplant recipients were recruited between June 2000 and December 2002. Serum phosphate was measured at baseline and prospective follow-up data were collected at a median of 2441 days after enrolment.
RESULTS.: Serum phosphate was significantly higher in those renal transplant recipients who died at follow-up when compared with those who were still alive at follow-up (P<0.001). In Kaplan-Meier analysis, serum phosphate concentration was a significant predictor of mortality (P=0.0001). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, serum phosphate concentration remained a statistically significant predictor of all-cause mortality after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (P=0.036) and after adjustment for renal graft failure (P=0.001).
CONCLUSIONS.: The results of this prospective study are the first to show that a higher serum phosphate is a predictor of mortality in patients with a renal transplant and suggest that serum phosphate provides additional, independent, prognostic information to that provided by traditional risk factors in the risk assessment of patients with a renal transplant.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1040-1044
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume87
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Elevated serum phosphate predicts mortality in renal transplant recipients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this