Ethnoreligious change in Northern Ireland and Zimbabwe: A comparative study of how religious havens can have ethnic significance

Gladys Ganiel*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study compares the internal dynamics of religious change in the 'post-evangelical' Ikon community in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and a charismatic, multiethnic congregation in Harare, Zimbabwe. Although the theological ideas behind Ikon and the congregation vary widely, the processes whereby both groups manage change are broadly similar and have wider theoretical significance. Accordingly, this article analyses how people use the religious resources of their traditions to construct 'havens' in which change is facilitated. Havens are conceived of as safe spaces where people use religious resources to challenge ethnic boundaries and power structures. They can be seen to function as mechanisms for disrupting long-entrenched feedback patterns of opposition and conflict.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)103-120
    Number of pages18
    JournalEthnopolitics
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • Political Science and International Relations
    • Cultural Studies

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