Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) genes modulate plant root exudate composition and the attraction of plant parasitic nematodes

Steven Dyer, Ryan Weir, Deborah Cox, Xavier Cheseto, Baldwyn Torto, Johnathan J. Dalzell*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
150 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Plant root exudates are compositionally diverse, plastic and adaptive. Ethylene signalling influences the attraction of plant parasitic nematodes, presumably through the modulation of root exudate composition. Understanding this pathway could lead to new sources of crop parasite resistance. Here we used Virus-Induced Gene Silencing to knock down the expression of two Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) genes, ERF-E2 and ERF-E3, in tomato. Root exudates were significantly more attractive to the PPNs Meloidogyne incognita and Globodera pallida following knockdown of ERF-E2, which had no impact on the attraction of Meloidogyne javanica. Knockdown of ERF-E3 had no impact on the attraction of Meloidogyne or Globodera spp. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed major changes in root exudate composition relative to controls. However, these changes did not alter the attraction of rhizosphere microbes Bacillus subtilis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This study further supports the potential of engineering plant root exudate for parasite control, through the modulation of plant genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)999-1003
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology
Volume49
Issue number13-14
Early online date11 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens
  • Bacillus subtilis
  • Globodera pallida
  • Host finding
  • Meloidogyne incognita
  • Meloidogyne javanica
  • Tomato
  • VIGS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) genes modulate plant root exudate composition and the attraction of plant parasitic nematodes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this