Evolving southwest African response to abrupt deglacial North Atlantic climate change events

Brian M. Chase, Arnoud Boom, Andrew S. Carr, Matthew Carré, Manuel Chevalier, Michael E. Meadows, Joel B. Pedro, J. Curt Stager, Paula J. Reimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate change during the last deglaciation was strongly influenced by the „bipolar seesaw‟, producing antiphase climate responses between the North and South Atlantic. However, mounting evidence demands refinements of this model, with the occurrence of abrupt events in southern low to mid latitudes occurring in-phase with North Atlantic climate. Improved constraints on the north-south phasing and spatial extent of these events are therefore critical to
understanding the mechanisms that propagate abrupt events within the climate system. We present a 19,400 year multi-proxy record of climate change obtained from a rock hyrax midden in southernmost Africa. Arid anomalies in phase with the Younger Dryas and 8.2 ka events are apparent, indicating a clear shift in the influence of the bipolar seesaw, which diminished as the Earth warmed, and was succeeded after ~14.6 ka by the emergence of a dominant interhemispheric atmospheric teleconnection.
LanguageEnglish
Pages132-136
Number of pages5
JournalQuaternary Science Reviews
Volume121
Early online date01 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2015

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climate change
climate
event
Procaviidae
midden
last deglaciation
teleconnection
Younger Dryas
rocks
anomaly
rock
Africa
North Atlantic
Southwest
Climate Change
evidence
Climate
demand

Keywords

  • southern Africa
  • palaeoclimate
  • hyrax middens
  • bipolar seesaw
  • ATLANTIC

Cite this

Chase, Brian M. ; Boom, Arnoud ; Carr, Andrew S. ; Carré, Matthew ; Chevalier, Manuel ; Meadows, Michael E. ; Pedro, Joel B. ; Stager, J. Curt ; Reimer, Paula J. / Evolving southwest African response to abrupt deglacial North Atlantic climate change events. In: Quaternary Science Reviews. 2015 ; Vol. 121. pp. 132-136.
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Chase, BM, Boom, A, Carr, AS, Carré, M, Chevalier, M, Meadows, ME, Pedro, JB, Stager, JC & Reimer, PJ 2015, 'Evolving southwest African response to abrupt deglacial North Atlantic climate change events', Quaternary Science Reviews, vol. 121, pp. 132-136. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.05.023

Evolving southwest African response to abrupt deglacial North Atlantic climate change events. / Chase, Brian M.; Boom, Arnoud; Carr, Andrew S.; Carré, Matthew; Chevalier, Manuel; Meadows, Michael E.; Pedro, Joel B. ; Stager, J. Curt ; Reimer, Paula J.

In: Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 121, 01.08.2015, p. 132-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Chase, Brian M.

AU - Boom, Arnoud

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AU - Chevalier, Manuel

AU - Meadows, Michael E.

AU - Pedro, Joel B.

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AU - Reimer, Paula J.

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