Evolving techniques for characterising and monitoring the stability of infrastructure slopes

Kaine Lynch, David Hughes, Md Rajibul Karim, Ruth Harley, Andy Bell, Jennifer McKinley, Shane Donohue, Paolo Bergamo

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    Abstract

    Landslides and debris flows, commonly triggered by rainfall, pose a geotechnical risk causing disruption to transport routes and incur significant financial expenditure. With infrastructure maintenance budgets becoming ever more constrained, this paper provides an overview of some of the developing methods being implemented by Queen’s University, Belfast in collaboration with the Department for Regional Development to monitor the stability of two distinctly different infrastructure slopes in Northern Ireland. In addition to the traditional, intrusive ground investigative and laboratory testing methods, aerial LiDAR, terrestrial LiDAR, geophysical techniques and differential Global Positioning Systems have been used to monitor slope stability. Finally, a comparison between terrestrial LiDAR, pore water pressure and soil moisture deficit (SMD) is presented to outline the processes for a more informed management regime and to highlight the season relationship between landslide activity and the aforementioned parameters.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages6
    Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2015
    EventXVI European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering - Scotland, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Duration: 13 Sep 201517 Sep 2015

    Conference

    ConferenceXVI European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    CityEdinburgh
    Period13/09/201517/09/2015

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