Examining individual differences in wellbeing, anxiety and depression in psoriasis using a Clinically-modified Buddhist Psychological Model

Alan Maddock, David Hevey, Paul D’Alton, Brian Kirby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
63 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Abstract
Psoriasis patients can experience a range of psychosocial difficulties, which can lead to issues with wellbeing, anxiety and depression. Mindfulness-based interventions have positive impacts on these outcomes; however, there is a need to identify the mechanisms of action of such interventions. This study attempts to do so by examining individual differences in psoriasis patients’ wellbeing, anxiety and depression using a clinically modified Buddhist psychological model (CBPM). Psoriasis patients (N = 285) and (N = 209) completed measures of each CBPM component at time 1 and 2. SEM analyses found that a direct and mediated effect of CBPM model was a good fit to the participant’s data. This study suggests that non-attachment, aversion, acceptance and self-compassion could have a direct effect on the wellbeing, anxiety and depression of psoriasis patients and an indirect effect through reduced worry and rumination. This study provided preliminary evidence for the CBPM as being a useful explanatory framework of psoriasis patients’ anxiety, depression and wellbeing.
Keywords Psoriasis · Mindfulness · Depression · Anxiety · Wellbeing
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)842-858
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 04 Dec 2020

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