Examining the inner logic of students’ coding orientations and the internal structure of written language in math tests from Basil Bernstein's code theory

Tien Hui Chiang*, Xing Ma, Rongxin Zhang, Allen Thurston, Shan Jiang, Su Wei Lin, Maria Cockerill

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study uses a questionnaire survey (n = 2.098) to examine how the use of everyday language and slower-paced teaching in math instruction regulates the practice of rules of recognition and realization. The results of a Structural Equational Modelling (SEM) analysis revealed that while the recognition-realization-rules formula was confirmed, the better way to improve students’ performance in math tests was not to slow the pace of teaching but to use everyday language because the latter meaningfully linked to their context-based experiences. This means an innovative presentation of pedagogical information through either unpacking or enhanced pedagogy greatly improves their results in math tests.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102307
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Research
Volume124
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Basil Bernstein
  • Enhanced pedagogy
  • Presentation of pedagogical information
  • Realization rules
  • Recognition rules
  • The inner logic of linguistic codes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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