Experimental "Microcultures" in Young Children: Identifying Biographic, Cognitive, and Social Predictors of Information Transmission

Emma Flynn*, Andrew Whiten

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In one of the first open diffusion experiments with young children, a tool-use task that afforded multiple methods to extract an enclosed reward and a child model habitually using one of these methods were introduced into different playgroups. Eighty-eight children, ranging in age from 2years 8months to 4years 5months, participated. Measures were taken of how alternative methods and success in extracting rewards spread across the different groups. Additionally, the biographic, social, cognitive, and temperamental predictors of social learning were investigated. Variations in social learning were related to age, popularity, dominance, impulsivity, and shyness, while other factors such as sex, theory of mind, verbal ability, and even imitativeness showed little association with variance in children's information acquisition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)911-925
Number of pages15
JournalChild Development
Volume83
Issue number3
Early online date14 Mar 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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