Exploring knowledge of pre-eclampsia and views on a potential screening test in women with type 1 diabetes

Amy Wotherspoon, Ian Young, David McCance, Valerie Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
258 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: To explore knowledge of pre-eclampsia and opinions on potential screening tests for pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes.

Design: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of women planning a pregnancy, currently pregnant or post-partum with experience of pre-eclampsia.

Setting, Participants and Methods: Eleven women with type 1 diabetes were recruited from a pre-pregnancy planning clinic or antenatal clinic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the women, asking a series of open-ended questions about their current knowledge of pre-eclampsia and their views on screening for pre-eclampsia. Data analysis was conducted using inductive thematic analysis.

Findings: Four main themes were identified: Information, sources of stress, awareness and acceptability of screening. Generally, women's knowledge of pre-eclampsia was limited. Most did not appear to be aware of their increased risk of developing the disease. Similarly, the majority of women were unaware as to why their blood pressure and urine were checked regularly. The introduction of a screening test for pre-eclampsia was favoured, with only a small number of women raising concerns related to the screening tests.

Conclusions: Health care professionals need to raise awareness of pre-eclampsia in this high risk group. The introduction of a screening test for pre-eclampsia appears to be acceptable in this population, however, further research is required to validate these findings and also to explore the views of women in other high risk groups.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMidwifery
Early online date30 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 30 Mar 2017

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