Fast-drying multi-laminate bioadhesive films for transdermal and topical drug delivery

Ryan F Donnelly, Paul A McCarron, Desmond I J Morrow, A David Woolfson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No bioadhesive patch-based system is currently marketed. This is despite an extensive number of literature reports on such systems detailing their advantages over conventional pressure sensitive adhesive-based patches in wet environments and describing successful delivery of a diverse array of drug substances. This lack of proprietary bioadhesive patches is largely due to the fact that such systems are exclusively water-based, meaning drying is difficult. In this paper we describe, for the first time, a novel multiple lamination method for production of bioadhesive patches. In contrast to patches produced using a conventional casting approach, which took 48 hours to dry, bioadhesive films prepared using the novel multiple lamination method were dried in 15?min and were folded into formed patches in a further 10?min. Patches prepared by both methods had comparable physicochemical properties. The multiple lamination method allowed supersaturation of 5-aminolevulinic acid to be achieved in formed patch matrices. However, drug release studies were unable to show an advantage for supersaturation with this particular drug, due to its water high solubility. The multiple lamination method allowed greater than 90% of incorporated nicotine to remain within formed patches, in contrast to the 48% achieved for patches prepared using a conventional casting approach. The procedure described here could readily be adapted for automation by industry. Due to the reduced time, energy and ensuing finance now required, this could lead to bioadhesive patch-based drug delivery systems becoming commercially viable. This would, in turn, mean that pathological conditions occurring in wet or moist areas of the body could now be routinely treated by prolonged site-specific drug delivery, as mediated by a commercially produced bioadhesive patch.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1818-1831
Number of pages14
JournalDrug Development and Industrial Pharmacy
Volume39
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology
  • Organic Chemistry

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