Fifteen-minute consultation: Symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease

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Abstract

Meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of meningitis, sepsis and death in children worldwide and in the UK. Successful vaccination programmes in the UK have, however, significantly reduced the burden of disease in children. Unfortunately, despite vaccination, a significant number of children are still diagnosed with invasive meningococcal disease each year.As the prevalence of meningococcal disease falls, it is important that we maintain awareness of the symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease because the prompt recognition of this life-threatening infection improves outcomes.In this article we discuss the pathology, epidemiology and recognition of invasive meningococcal disease in children. The aim is to maintain awareness of this rare but life-threatening infection.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of disease in childhood. Education and practice edition
Early online date16 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 16 Oct 2019

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Signs and Symptoms
Referral and Consultation
Vaccination
Infection
Meningitis
Sepsis
Epidemiology
Pathology

Bibliographical note

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Cite this

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title = "Fifteen-minute consultation: Symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease",
abstract = "Meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of meningitis, sepsis and death in children worldwide and in the UK. Successful vaccination programmes in the UK have, however, significantly reduced the burden of disease in children. Unfortunately, despite vaccination, a significant number of children are still diagnosed with invasive meningococcal disease each year.As the prevalence of meningococcal disease falls, it is important that we maintain awareness of the symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease because the prompt recognition of this life-threatening infection improves outcomes.In this article we discuss the pathology, epidemiology and recognition of invasive meningococcal disease in children. The aim is to maintain awareness of this rare but life-threatening infection.",
author = "Michael Corr and Thomas Waterfield and Michael Shields",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2019",
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day = "16",
doi = "10.1136/archdischild-2019-317722",
language = "English",
journal = "Archives of disease in childhood. Education and practice edition",
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T1 - Fifteen-minute consultation: Symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease

AU - Corr, Michael

AU - Waterfield, Thomas

AU - Shields, Michael

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2019/10/16

Y1 - 2019/10/16

N2 - Meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of meningitis, sepsis and death in children worldwide and in the UK. Successful vaccination programmes in the UK have, however, significantly reduced the burden of disease in children. Unfortunately, despite vaccination, a significant number of children are still diagnosed with invasive meningococcal disease each year.As the prevalence of meningococcal disease falls, it is important that we maintain awareness of the symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease because the prompt recognition of this life-threatening infection improves outcomes.In this article we discuss the pathology, epidemiology and recognition of invasive meningococcal disease in children. The aim is to maintain awareness of this rare but life-threatening infection.

AB - Meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of meningitis, sepsis and death in children worldwide and in the UK. Successful vaccination programmes in the UK have, however, significantly reduced the burden of disease in children. Unfortunately, despite vaccination, a significant number of children are still diagnosed with invasive meningococcal disease each year.As the prevalence of meningococcal disease falls, it is important that we maintain awareness of the symptoms and signs of meningococcal disease because the prompt recognition of this life-threatening infection improves outcomes.In this article we discuss the pathology, epidemiology and recognition of invasive meningococcal disease in children. The aim is to maintain awareness of this rare but life-threatening infection.

U2 - 10.1136/archdischild-2019-317722

DO - 10.1136/archdischild-2019-317722

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31619453

JO - Archives of disease in childhood. Education and practice edition

JF - Archives of disease in childhood. Education and practice edition

SN - 1743-0585

ER -