Flawed MIREC fluoride and intelligence quotient publications: A failed attempt to undermine community water fluoridation

Juliet R. Guichon*, Colin Cooper, Andrew Rugg‐Gunn, James A. Dickinson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the evidence presented in a set of articles that use the Canadian Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study database to claim that community water fluoridation (CWF) is associated with harm to foetal and infant cognitive development. Methods: Critical appraisal of measurements and processes in the MIREC database, and articles derived therefrom. MIREC's cohort is approximately 2000 pregnant women recruited in 10 centres across Canada, 2008–2011, leading to measuring 512 children aged 3–6 years in six cities. Fluoride exposure was measured by city fluoridation status, self‐reports and maternal spot urine samples. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) was measured using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI‐III) by different assessors in each city. Results: MIREC's fluoride and IQ measurements are invalid and therefore cannot support the claim that CWF is associated with IQ decline in children. Conclusions: The MIREC fluoride‐IQ articles' results should be considered unacceptable for legal and policy purposes; other water fluoridation studies and systematic reviews show no effect of fluoridation on cognition.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology
Early online date25 Mar 2024
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 25 Mar 2024

Keywords

  • community water fluoridation
  • fluoride exposure
  • IQ

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Flawed MIREC fluoride and intelligence quotient publications: A failed attempt to undermine community water fluoridation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this