Foodborne trematodes: old foes, new kids on the block and research perspectives for control and understanding host-parasite interactions

Mark W. Robinson*, Javier Sotillo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Foodborne trematodes (FBTs) have a worldwide distribution (with particular prevalence in south-east Asia) and are believed to infect almost 75 million people, with millions more living at risk of infection. Although mortality due to trematodiasis is low, these infections cause considerable morbidity and some species are associated with the development of cancer in hyperendemic regions. Despite this, FBTs are often side-lined in terms of research funding and have been dubbed neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organisation. Thus, the aim of this special issue was to provide an update of our understanding of FBT infections, to shine a light on current work in the field and to highlight some research priorities for the future. With contributions from leading researchers, many from endemic regions, we review the major FBT species. In doing so we revisit some old foes, uncover emerging infections and discover how outbreaks are being dealt with as a result of new approaches to parasite control. We also report advances in our understanding of the interactions of FBTs with their mammalian hosts and uncover new interplay between trematodes and host microbiome components. We hope that this article collection will stimulate discussion and further research on the FBTs and help raise them from their neglected status.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1257-1261
Number of pages5
JournalParasitology
Volume149
Early online date23 Jun 2022
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

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