Fool’s gold? Why blinded trials are not always best: Why blinded trials are not always best

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Abstract

Blinding is intended to reduce bias but can make studies unnecessarily complex or lead to results that no longer address the clinical question
Original languageEnglish
Article numberl6228
Number of pages5
JournalBMJ
Volume368
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration
  • Data Accuracy
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Humans
  • Observer Variation
  • Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods
  • Patient Safety
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods
  • Research Design/standards

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