Functional, physiological and subjective responses to concurrent neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) exercise in adult cancer survivors: a controlled prospective study

Dominic O'Connor, Olive Lennon, Matilde Mora Fernandez, Gabriel Ruiz Signorelli, Brian Caulfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the functional, physiological and subjective responses to NMES exercise in cancer patients.

Methods: Participants with a cancer diagnosis, currently undergoing treatment, and an had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (ECOG) of 1 and 2 were recommended to participate by their oncologist. Following a 2-week, no-NMES control period, each participant was asked to undertake a concurrent NMES exercise intervention over a 4-week period. Functional muscle strength (30 second sit-to-stand (30STS)), mobility (timed up and go (TUG)), exercise capacity (6-minute walk test (6MWT)) and health related quality of life (HR-QoL) were assessed at baseline 1 (BL1), 2-week post control (BL2) and post 4-week NMES exercise intervention (POST). Physiological and subjective responses to LF-NMES were assessed during a 10-stage incremental session, recorded at BL2 and POST.

Results: Fourteen participants (mean age: 62 years (10)) completed the intervention. No adverse events were reported. 30STS (+2.4 reps, p=.007), and 6MWT (+44.3 m, p=.028) significantly improved after the intervention. No changes in TUG or HR-QoL were observed at POST.

Conclusions: Concurrent NMES exercise may be an effective exercise intervention for augmenting physical function in participants with cancer and moderate and poor functional status.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Scientific Reports
Early online date19 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 19 Aug 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Functional, physiological and subjective responses to concurrent neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) exercise in adult cancer survivors: a controlled prospective study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this