Further evidence for cryptic north-western refugia in Europe? Mitochondrial phylogeography of the sibling species Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Pipistrellus pygmaeus

Emma S. M. Boston*, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Fionn Clissmann, Emma C. Teeling

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The geographic ranges of European plants and animals underwent periods of contraction and re-colonisation during the climatic oscillations of the Pleistocene. The southern Mediterranean peninsulas (Iberian, Italian and Balkan) have been considered the most likely refugia for temperate/warm adapted species. Recent studies however have revealed the existence of extra-Mediterranean refugia, including the existence of cryptic north-west European refugia during the Last Glacial Maxima (24-14.6 kyr BP). In this study we elucidated the phylogeographic history of two sibling bat species, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus in their western European range. We sequenced the highly variable mtDNA D-loop for 167 samples of P. pipistrellus (n = 99) and P. pygmaeus (n = 68) and combined our data with published sequences from 331 individuals. Using phylogenetic methodologies we assessed their biogeographic history. Our data support a single eastern European origin for populations of P. pygmaeus s.str., yet multiple splits and origins for populations of P. pipistrellus s.str., including evidence for refugia within refugia and potential cryptic refugia in north western Europe and in the Caucasus. This complex pattern in the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes supports a long history for P. pipistrellus s.str. in Europe, and the hypothesis that species with a broad ecological niche may have adapted and survived outside southern peninsula throughout the LGM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-277
Number of pages15
JournalActa Chiropterologica
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

Keywords

  • novel refugia
  • western Europe
  • last glacial maxima
  • mammal
  • Chiroptera
  • EXTRA-MEDITERRANEAN REFUGIA
  • GREATER HORSESHOE BAT
  • GLACIAL REFUGIA
  • POPULATION-GENETICS
  • POSTGLACIAL COLONIZATION
  • HABITAT SELECTION
  • RANGE SIZE
  • EARED BATS
  • ICE AGES
  • CHIROPTERA

Cite this

Boston, Emma S. M. ; Puechmaille, Sebastien J. ; Clissmann, Fionn ; Teeling, Emma C. / Further evidence for cryptic north-western refugia in Europe? Mitochondrial phylogeography of the sibling species Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Pipistrellus pygmaeus. In: Acta Chiropterologica. 2014 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 263-277.
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abstract = "The geographic ranges of European plants and animals underwent periods of contraction and re-colonisation during the climatic oscillations of the Pleistocene. The southern Mediterranean peninsulas (Iberian, Italian and Balkan) have been considered the most likely refugia for temperate/warm adapted species. Recent studies however have revealed the existence of extra-Mediterranean refugia, including the existence of cryptic north-west European refugia during the Last Glacial Maxima (24-14.6 kyr BP). In this study we elucidated the phylogeographic history of two sibling bat species, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus in their western European range. We sequenced the highly variable mtDNA D-loop for 167 samples of P. pipistrellus (n = 99) and P. pygmaeus (n = 68) and combined our data with published sequences from 331 individuals. Using phylogenetic methodologies we assessed their biogeographic history. Our data support a single eastern European origin for populations of P. pygmaeus s.str., yet multiple splits and origins for populations of P. pipistrellus s.str., including evidence for refugia within refugia and potential cryptic refugia in north western Europe and in the Caucasus. This complex pattern in the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes supports a long history for P. pipistrellus s.str. in Europe, and the hypothesis that species with a broad ecological niche may have adapted and survived outside southern peninsula throughout the LGM.",
keywords = "novel refugia, western Europe, last glacial maxima, mammal, Chiroptera, EXTRA-MEDITERRANEAN REFUGIA, GREATER HORSESHOE BAT, GLACIAL REFUGIA, POPULATION-GENETICS, POSTGLACIAL COLONIZATION, HABITAT SELECTION, RANGE SIZE, EARED BATS, ICE AGES, CHIROPTERA",
author = "Boston, {Emma S. M.} and Puechmaille, {Sebastien J.} and Fionn Clissmann and Teeling, {Emma C.}",
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Further evidence for cryptic north-western refugia in Europe? Mitochondrial phylogeography of the sibling species Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Pipistrellus pygmaeus. / Boston, Emma S. M.; Puechmaille, Sebastien J.; Clissmann, Fionn; Teeling, Emma C.

In: Acta Chiropterologica, Vol. 16, No. 2, 12.2014, p. 263-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Boston, Emma S. M.

AU - Puechmaille, Sebastien J.

AU - Clissmann, Fionn

AU - Teeling, Emma C.

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AB - The geographic ranges of European plants and animals underwent periods of contraction and re-colonisation during the climatic oscillations of the Pleistocene. The southern Mediterranean peninsulas (Iberian, Italian and Balkan) have been considered the most likely refugia for temperate/warm adapted species. Recent studies however have revealed the existence of extra-Mediterranean refugia, including the existence of cryptic north-west European refugia during the Last Glacial Maxima (24-14.6 kyr BP). In this study we elucidated the phylogeographic history of two sibling bat species, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus in their western European range. We sequenced the highly variable mtDNA D-loop for 167 samples of P. pipistrellus (n = 99) and P. pygmaeus (n = 68) and combined our data with published sequences from 331 individuals. Using phylogenetic methodologies we assessed their biogeographic history. Our data support a single eastern European origin for populations of P. pygmaeus s.str., yet multiple splits and origins for populations of P. pipistrellus s.str., including evidence for refugia within refugia and potential cryptic refugia in north western Europe and in the Caucasus. This complex pattern in the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes supports a long history for P. pipistrellus s.str. in Europe, and the hypothesis that species with a broad ecological niche may have adapted and survived outside southern peninsula throughout the LGM.

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KW - western Europe

KW - last glacial maxima

KW - mammal

KW - Chiroptera

KW - EXTRA-MEDITERRANEAN REFUGIA

KW - GREATER HORSESHOE BAT

KW - GLACIAL REFUGIA

KW - POPULATION-GENETICS

KW - POSTGLACIAL COLONIZATION

KW - HABITAT SELECTION

KW - RANGE SIZE

KW - EARED BATS

KW - ICE AGES

KW - CHIROPTERA

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DO - 10.3161/150811014X687233

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 263

EP - 277

JO - Acta Chiropterologica

JF - Acta Chiropterologica

SN - 1508-1109

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ER -