GiveMe Shelter: a people-centred design process for promoting independent inquiry-led learning in engineering

Mark Dyer, Thomas Grey, Oliver Kinnane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has become increasingly common for tasks traditionally carried out by engineers to be undertaken by technicians and technologist with access to sophisticated computers and software that can often perform complex calculations that were previously the responsibility of engineers. Not surprisingly, this development raises serious questions about the future role of engineers and the education needed to address these changes in technology as well as emerging priorities from societal to environmental challenges. In response to these challenges, a new design module was created for undergraduate engineering students to design and build temporary shelters for a wide variety of end users from refugees, to the homeless and children. Even though the module provided guidance on principles of design thinking and methods for observing users needs through field studies, the students found it difficult to respond to needs of specific end users but instead focused more on purely technical issues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
JournalEuropean Journal of Engineering Education
Early online date31 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 31 Aug 2016

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emergency shelter
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refugee
student
Education
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software

Cite this

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GiveMe Shelter: a people-centred design process for promoting independent inquiry-led learning in engineering. / Dyer, Mark; Grey, Thomas; Kinnane, Oliver.

In: European Journal of Engineering Education, 31.08.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Grey, Thomas

AU - Kinnane, Oliver

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