Going above and beyond: how sustainability culture and entrepreneurial orientation drive social sustainability supply chain practice adoption

Donna Marshall, Lucy McCarthy, Paul McGrath, Marius Claudy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose
– This paper aims to examine what drives the adoption of different social sustainability supply chain practices. Research has shown that certain factors drive the adoption of environmental sustainability practices but few focus on social supply chain practices, delineate which practices are adopted or what drives their adoption.

Design/methodology/approach
– The authors examine the facilitative role of sustainability culture to explain the adoption of social sustainability supply chain practices: basic practices, consisting of monitoring and management systems and advanced practices, which are new product and process development and strategic redefinition. The authors then explore the role played by a firm’s entrepreneurial orientation in shaping and reinforcing the adoption of social sustainability supply chain practices. A survey of 156 supply chain managers in multiple industries in Ireland was conducted to test the relationship between the variables.

Findings
– The findings show that sustainability culture is positively related to all the practices, and entrepreneurial orientation impacts and moderates social sustainability culture in advanced social sustainability supply chain adoption.

Research limitations/implications
– As with any survey, this is a single point in time with a single respondent. Implications for managers include finding the right culture in the organisation to implement social sustainability supply chain management practices that go beyond monitoring to behavioural changes in the supply chain with implications beyond the dyad of buyer and supplier to lower tier suppliers and the community surrounding the supply chain.

Practical implications
– The implications for managers include developing and fostering cultural attributes in the organisation to implement social sustainability supply chain management practices that go beyond monitoring suppliers to behavioural changes in the supply chain with implications beyond the dyad of buyer and supplier to lower tier suppliers and the community surrounding the supply chain.

Originality/value
– This is the first time, to the authors’ knowledge, that cultural and entrepreneurial variables have been tested for social sustainability supply chain practices, giving them new insights into how and why social sustainability supply chain practices are adopted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-454
Number of pages20
JournalSupply Chain Management
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Sustainable supply chains
  • Social factors

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Going above and beyond: how sustainability culture and entrepreneurial orientation drive social sustainability supply chain practice adoption'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this