Hate crime legislation and violence against sex workers in Ireland: Lessons in Policy and Practice

Graham Ellison, Lucy Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Drawing on data from UglyMugs.ie (a reporting mechanism for sex workers) this paper considers whether crimes against sex workers should be considered as hate crimes. In many ways, the debates around hate crime in the UK are more developed than in Ireland. As yet the Irish State has yet to criminalise the ‘hate’ element of crime and has been severely criticised for its relatively lacklustre approach to recording incidents of bias or hate crimes against certain social groups. The paper adopts the structural understanding of hate crime espoused by Barbara Perry (2001) who frames the dynamics of hate crime within a complex interplay of political, social and cultural factors. In our analysis we consider what is termed ‘whorephobia’ through the ambit of criminalisation and stigmatisation, gender and heteronormativity in Irish society, and the gendered nature of policing in both parts of Ireland.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Perspectives on Hate Crime: Contributions from the Island of Ireland
EditorsHaynes Amanda, Jennifer Schweppe, Seamus Taylor
PublisherSpringer
Pages179-207
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2017

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