Heller's myotomy and pneumatic dilatation in the treatment of achalasia: a population-based case–control study assessing long-term quality of life

R. T. Gray, H. G. Coleman, K. W. Lau, C. McCaughey, P. V. Coyle, L. J. Murray, B. T. Johnston

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) outcomes have not been widely reported in the
treatment of achalasia. The aims of this study were to examine long-term disease-specific and general HRQL in
achalasia patients using a population-based case–control method, and to assess HRQL between treatment interventions.
Manometrically diagnosed achalasia cases (n = 120) were identified and matched with controls (n = 115)
using a population-based approach. Participants completed general (SF-12) and disease-specific (Achalasia Severity
Questionnaire [ASQ]) HRQL questionnaires, as appropriate, in a structured interview. Mean composite scores
for SF-12 (Mental Component Summary score [MCS-12] and Physical Component Summary score [PCS-12]) and
ASQ were compared between cases and controls, or between intervention groups, using an independent t-test.
Adjusted mean differences in HRQL scores were evaluated using a linear regression model. Achalasia cases were
treated with a Heller’s myotomy (n = 43), pneumatic dilatation (n = 44), or both modalities (n = 33). The median
time from last treatment to HRQL assessment was 5.7 years (interquartile range 2.4–11.5). Comparing achalasia
patients with controls, PCS-12 was significantly worse (40.9 vs. 44.2, P = 0.01), but MCS-12 was similar. However,
both PCS-12 (39.9 vs. 44.2, P = 0.03) and MCS-12 (46.7 vs. 53.5, P = 0.004) were significantly impaired in those
requiring dual treatment compared with controls. Overall however, there was no difference in adjusted HRQL
between patients treated with Heller’s myotomy, pneumatic dilatation or both treatment modalities. In summary,
despite treatment achalasia patients have significantly worse long-term physical HRQL compared with population
controls. No HRQL differences were observed between the treatment modalities to suggest a benefit of one
treatment over another.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Esophagus
Early online date20 Dec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Mar 2017

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