Home-based versus hospital-based rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: A randomized trial with preference arms - Cornwall Heart Attack Rehabilitation Management Study (CHARMS)

H. M. Dalal*, P. H. Evans, J. L. Campbell, R. S. Taylor, A. Watt, K. L.Q. Read, A. J. Mourant, J. Wingham, David, R Thompson , D. J.Pereira Gray

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Participation in cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction is sub-optimal. Offering home-based rehabilitation may improve uptake. We report the first randomized study of cardiac rehabilitation to include patient preference. Aim: To compare the clinical effectiveness of a home-based rehabilitation with hospital-based rehabilitation after myocardial infarction and to determine whether patient choice affects clinical outcomes. Design: Pragmatic randomized controlled trial with patient preference arms. Setting: Rural South West England. Methods: Patients admitted with uncomplicated myocardial infarction were offered hospital-based rehabilitation classes over 8-10 weeks or a self-help package of six weeks' duration (the Heart Manual) supported by a nurse. Primary outcomes at 9 months were mean depression and anxiety scores on the Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, quality of life after myocardial infarction (MacNew) score and serum total cholesterol. Results: Of the 230 patients who agreed to participate, 104 (45%) consented to randomization and 126 (55%) chose their rehabilitation programme. Nine month follow-up data were available for 84/104 (81%) randomized and 100/126 (79%) preference patients. At follow-up no difference was seen in the change in mean depression scores between the randomized home and hospital-based groups (mean difference: 0; 95% confidence interval, - 1.12 to 1.12) nor mean anxiety score (- 0.07; - 1.42 to 1.28), mean global MacNew score (0.14; - 0.35 to 0.62) and mean total cholesterol levels (- 0.18; - 0.62 to 0.27). Neither were there any significant differences in outcomes between the preference groups. Conclusions: Home-based cardiac rehabilitation with the Heart Manual was as effective as hospital-based rehabilitation for patients after myocardial infarction. Choosing a rehabilitation programme did not significantly affect clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-211
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2007

Keywords

  • Cardiac rehabilitation
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Patient preference
  • Randomized trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Home-based versus hospital-based rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: A randomized trial with preference arms - Cornwall Heart Attack Rehabilitation Management Study (CHARMS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this